Monthly Dividend Stocks to Pay the Bills

Source: GotCredit

The following is an excerpt from 7 Top Monthly Dividend Stocks and Funds to Buy, originally published on Kiplinger’s.

The mortgage is due every month. So are utility bills, car payments and the membership to the gym that many of us don’t actually use.

That’s not a major problem for many people because they get regular paychecks. But when they eventually retire, it would be nice to at least partially match income to their expenses.

Enter monthly dividend stocks. While bonds generally pay twice per year and most American stocks pay quarterly, a few select few stocks, ETFs and closed-end funds pay monthly, making them ideally suited for retirees living off their investments.

Naturally, you should be skeptical of gimmicky stocks, and you should never buy a stock simply because it pays a monthly dividend. Any investment you buy should meet your basic smell test for quality and should be attractively priced.

Thankfully, plenty of monthly dividend stocks make the cut. Today, we’re going to take a look at a diverse lot of seven monthly payers. Three are high-quality REITs, two are conservative ETFs, one is a dirt-cheap closed-end fund and one is a more speculative business development company trading at a deep discount. But all have one thing in common: They pay their dividends monthly.

EPR Properties

Certain “oddball” dividend payersdon’t have a built-in base of buyers or that institutional investors tend to avoid because they don’t fit nicely into a style box. This tends to make them perpetual value stocks.

One such quirky stock is EPR Properties (EPR), a REIT that specializes in entertainment and educational properties.

Most REITs specialize in broad categories of real estate, such as offices or apartments. EPR’s specialty is far narrower. Forty-four percent of its portfolio is invested in entertainment properties, primarily movie theaters. Another 32% is invested in recreational properties, such as TopGolf driving ranges and ski resorts. And 21% of the portfolio is invested in educational properties such as charter schools and daycare centers. It’s an eclectic mix you’re not going to find anywhere else.

EPR Properties also sports a high yield that you’re unlikely to find anywhere else without taking a lot more risk. EPR boasts a 7.3% dividend at the moment, and it has grown its payout at about 7% per year since 2010.

REITs have gotten absolutely thrashed over the past year, and EPR is no exception. Its stock has lost more than a quarter of its value in less than a year, and the selloff might not even be over yet. But at today’s prices, expect EPR to deliver solid, market-beating returns over at least the next five years.

To continue reading, see  7 Top Monthly Dividend Stocks and Funds to Buy.

Disclosures: Long EPR



This article first appeared on Sizemore Insights as Monthly Dividend Stocks to Pay the Bills

Oddball Dividend Stocks With Big Yields


Copyright Wintertwined

The following is an excerpt from 5 “Oddball” Dividend Stocks With Big Yields, originally published on Kiplinger’s.

It’s not the easiest market out there for income investors. With bond yields being depressed for so many years (and still extremely low by any historical standard) investors have scoured the globe for yield, which has pushed the yields on many traditional income investments – namely, bonds and dividend stocks – to levels far too low to be taken seriously.

Even after rising over the past several months, the yield on the 10-year Treasury is still only 2.9%, and the 30-year Treasury yields all of 3.2%. (Don’t spend that all in one place!) The utility sector, which many investors have been using as a bond substitute, yields only 3.4%. Yields on real estate investment trusts (REITs) are almost competitive at 4.4%, but only when you consider the low-yield competition.

Bond yields have been rising since September, due in part to expectations of greater economic growth and the inflation that generally comes with it. This has put pressure on all income-focused stocks. This little yield spike might not be over just yet, either – especially if inflation creeps higher this year.

Even if bond yields top out today and start to drift lower rather than higher, yields just aren’t high enough in most traditional income sectors to be worthwhile. So today, we’re going to cast the net a little wider. We’re going to take a look at five quirky dividend stocks that are a little out of the mainstream. Our goal is to secure high yields while also allowing for fast enough dividend growth to stay in front of inflation.

The GEO Group

Few companies are as quirky – or have quite the pariah status – as The GEO Group (GEO). GEO is a private operator of prisons that is organized as a real estate investment trust, or REIT.

Yes, it’s a prison REIT.

Prison overcrowding has been a problem for years. It seems that while getting tough on crime is popular with voters, paying the bill to build expensive new prisons is not.

This is about as far from a feel-good stock as you can get. It ranks alongside tobacco stocks on the scale of political incorrectness. The sheer ugliness of its business partially explains why it sports such a high dividend yield at well above 8%.

It’s also worth noting that this stock is riskier than everything else on this list. The U.S. is slowly moving in the direction of legalization of soft drugs like marijuana. While full legalization at the federal level isn’t yet on the horizon, you have to consider that a significant potential risk to GEO’s business model. Roughly half of all prisoners in federal prisons are there on drug-related convictions. At the state level, that number is about 16%.

GEO likely would survive drug legalization, as the privatization of public services is part of a bigger trend for cash-strapped governments. But it would definitely slow the REIT’s growth and it would seriously raise questions of dividend sustainability.

Furthermore, prison properties have very little resale value. You can turn an old warehouse into a trendy urban apartment building. But a prison? That’s a tougher sell.

So again, GEO is a riskier pick. But with a yield of more than 8%, you’re at least getting paid well to accept that risk.

To read the rest of the article, please see  5 “Oddball” Dividend Stocks With Big Yields,

This article first appeared on Sizemore Insights as Oddball Dividend Stocks With Big Yields

Dividend Achievers Massively Hiking Their Dividends

The following is an excerpt from 7 Dividend Achievers With Big Income Potential

There is an old Wall Street maxim that the safest dividend is the one that’s just been raised. Which is why if you’re not familiar with Dividend Achievers, you should be.

You can always find that occasional company that continued raising its dividend right up until it cut it (Kinder Morgan in 2015). But generally speaking, it’s safe to say that a dividend stock aggressively raising its payout is a healthy company and one that is justifiably confident about its future.

Earnings per share can be aggressively manipulated, as can reported revenues. Even the cash flow statement can be suspect because it ultimately pulls most of its key data points from the income statement, which can be a work of creative fiction.

Paying a dividend requires actual cash on hand. And a dividend hike implies that management is confident that there will be a lot more cash coming down the pipeline to support a higher dividend in the quarters ahead.

But even when it comes to dividends, you have to look out for chicanery and focus on quality. That means paying the dividend out of real profits and cash flows, not debt or new share issuance. As forensic accountant John Del Vecchio, co-manager of the AdvisorShares Ranger Equity Bear ETF (HDGE), says, “Dividends are a distribution of profits; a way for a company to reward its patient shareholders. But a dividend paid from debt or equity proceeds isn’t a dividend at all, but rather a return of capital. Don’t be fooled by a company returning your own money to you while calling it a dividend.”

Today, we’re going to take a look at Dividend Achievers – companies with a history of raising their annual dividends for a minimum of 10 consecutive years – that aren’t just providing token upticks. The idea is that we’re limiting our pool to stable companies with a long history of safely delivering the goods, but that also are well-positioned for growth in the immediate future.


Toro Company

Toro Company (TTC), a maker of lawn irrigation systems and high-end riding lawnmowers, might not have a particularly sexy or interesting business, but the industry is a resilient one. Toro has raised its dividend every year since 2003 – the one asterisk is that it kept the quarterly payout level in 2008 amid the market meltdown, but paid more on an annual basis than it did the year prior.

At the end of 2017, Toro raised its dividend by 14%. This followed a nearly 17% dividend hike the year before. Over the past 10 years, the stock has raised its dividend at an annual clip of nearly 20%. The 1.3% current yield might not be exceptionally high, but whatever the stock lacks in yield it more than compensates with dividend growth.

In Toro, you’re getting an aggressive dividend grower backed by strong demographic trends. With the Millennials starting to nest, that high dividend growth should continue for a while.

“As Millennials move through their adult lives, they’ll hit all the familiar milestones, forming families, having children, and putting down roots,” says Rodney Johnson, co-founder of economic forecasting firm Dent Research. “The transition will add growth to our economy as they fundamentally change their spending, moving from lattes to lawn care. Nothing says ‘I’m a homeowner and I’m proud!’ quite like lawn equipment!”

To read the remainder of this article, please see  7 Dividend Achievers With Big Income Potential

This article first appeared on Sizemore Insights as Dividend Achievers Massively Hiking Their Dividends

LyondellBasell: THIS Is What Buybacks Are Supposed to Look Like

Stock buybacks get a bad reputation — and justifiably so. It seems that for most companaies, a share repurchase is little more than an expensive mop to soak up share dilution from executive stock options or other share-based compensation.

So, it’s refreshing to see a company like LyondellBasell Industries (LYB). When Lyondell announces a share buyback, they mean it. The company has reduced its share count by about 10% per year for the past three years while also raising its dividend by nearly 20% per year.

That’s a company that takes care of its shareholders.

I recently added LyondellBasel to my Dividend Growth portfolio.

Disclosures: Long LYB

This article first appeared on Sizemore Insights as LyondellBasell: THIS Is What Buybacks Are Supposed to Look Like